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EXCLUSIVE: Windows Home Server In Detail

windows-home-server-logo.jpg

Any minute, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates will take the stage at CES and reveal for the world Windows Home Server. Before he does, here is everything you need to know about the Home Server product. Every word below, except when I editorialize, is 100% confirmed accurate (as are the two logos, screenshotted from a recent build of Home Server).

There’s a lot in here, so here’s the main stuff up front: A Windows Home Server is a simple box that lies at the center of your home network. The Server works without interaction (it doesn’t run programs like typical operatings systems, doesn’t even have a monitor port), simplifying some very complex tasks among all the computers in your home.

Home Server is where your family will store all of its important files. All music, video, photos, documents and even some software will sit on the Home Server, and all the computers in the home will be able to access it over your network (wired or wireless) as if they were on the computers themselves. You will even be able to access your files over the internet (don’t worry, everything is protected), and the killer feature: Home Server streams to the Xbox 360 and other Media Center Extenders devices that use Windows Media Connect.

Home Server also keeps your computers protected from disaster, by backing up every byte of data on every computer in the home. It can take an unlimited amount of storage space, backing up to internal and external hard drives the entire contents of every PC, not once, but twice, letting you restore files or entire PCs immediately. It even stores versions of files, so you can roll back that important spreadsheet to how it looked two weeks ago, or undo four days of awful video editing by your talentless sibling.

Now, sit back, relax, because here comes all the fine details, looking closely at almost every major aspect of Home Server.

There are three primary purposes of Home Server:

  • Automated Computer Backup – Home Server will sit in the middle of your house and completely backup the entire hard drives of every computer connected to it, automatically. Lose anything, even an entire computer, and you will be able to restore it. You will even be able to restore older versions of files, taking advantage of a valuable feature in Windows Vista.
  • Access Everything From Anywhere – With a Home Server, you will be able to access all of your files from any computer, inside or outside your home, as well as accessing your home computers from outside the home. You will centrally store your files to make them easier to access at all times.
  • Grows With You – Home Server will be designed to make it easier for users to expand its capabilities, especially making it easy to add more hard drives.

Home Server will be sold in two forms, just like Windows XP Media Center used to be: As a full hardware/software package by manufacturers, and as a software package to system builders. Home Server is designed as a “headless” system, which means that it is not designed to be accessed with a mouse, keyboard or monitor. In fact, the integrated hardware/software solutions are designed to be built without a monitor port!

According to Microsoft’s projections, Beta 2 of Home Server will arrive in just two weeks, on January 22. Pre-Beta 1 was reached last July. They are also projecting Release Candidate status by May 15 and the final Release To Manufacturing on June 22.

windows-home-server-logo-large.jpgSome details on the features:

Backups are automated and daily. In typical usage, it is plug and play, you never have to work with any settings or configuration. Only new or changed data is backed up, but everything will be backed up. In fact, if several copies of the same data is saved on different computers, Home Server will only back it up once on the server, and keep track of the various versions, not just by date, but by originating computer.

At any point, if something goes wrong, you can boot up a computer with a Home Computer Restore CD and it will connect to the Home Server with a simple wizard that will restore it from the backup. At any time, you can also access the Windows Home Server Console from any home computer and restore individual files and folders.

Storage can be internal or external hard drives (USB or Firewire) connected to the Home Server, while functionctioning as a RAID system. It comes pre-configured with shared folders named Music, Photos, Videos, Public and Software. Permissions for the various folders can be specified, and you can create any new shared folders you’d like. Moving files back and forth from the Home Server and the computers is as simple as dragging and dropping, just as if the Home Server was your computer’s own hard drive.

Everything in the shared folders is backed up, with snapshots taken twice a day. Every shared folder has two copies, on seperate hard drives. Previous Versions of files in shared folders will be available, so in Windows XP or Vista Ultimate/Enterprise/Business you can go to the Previous Versions tab in the properties of any file or folder and restore an older version of the file or folder. Previous Versions is not available in any Home version of Windows Vista.

Home Server monitors your network to ensure that everything is running smoothly. It makes sure that backups are being completed successfully and as scheduled, that all Server hard drives have enough space to ensure two copies of everything, and even checks the security status of all the computers on the network. Home Server collects the status from Windows Vista Security Center of all the home computers, and lets you monitor the security status of all the computers from the Windows Home Server Console.

A properly configured user account can remotely access the Home Server from any networked computer, or even access it remotely using a web browser. Remote users can download and upload files in shared folders. You’ll need to open up ports in your router for this, so if you want your Home Server isolated from the evils out there, that’s doable too.

Home Server can be used for media streaming, sending music, photos and video to an Xbox 360 console or supported digital media receiver (presumably Media Center Extenders and other Windows Media Connect devices) on your home network. Of course, playing back any of that media on any of your computers is just as easy, if not more so, streaming to Windows Media Player or Windows Media Center.

You access the Home Server through the Windows Home Server Console, which lets you view the backup status of all your connected PCs, configure up to 10 user accounts, configure shared folders, manage hard drives (including watching their status and even attempting to repair them), view network health. Shared folders can be configured on a per-user basis, and each user gets their personal folder on the server, that is private by default and can be shared with any other users. Any shared folder can have folder duplication turned on or off, so long as you have two or more hard drives. The default shared folders cannot be deleted, so applications and hardware can be built to expct them, but you can create any more you need.

File backup works on the block cluster level, not on the file level. Windows Volume Snapshot Services tracks the hash values of every block on the disk and compares the hash values with those of blocks already backed up. If the hash value changes, it sends those blocks to the Home Server. Thusly, Home Server knows when only portions of a file has changed, and tracks those changes. By default, Home Server will backup every hard drive on every computer, internal or external. You can manage your backups from Home Server Console, choosing which to keep and which to delete.

All storage on the Home Server is treated as a single drive, no matter how many drives you have, how they are split up, and whether they are internal or external, and there is no need for the user to configure what data goes on what drive. Hard drives do not have to be of equal size or type or speed, and Home Server will add them to available storage and determine which will be used for necessary duplication. Before you remove a hard drive, Home Server determines and explians to you how removal of that wdrive will affect the system, and will move critical data from that drive to other drives in the server.

Home Server owners will be able to set up a free internet address, like username.homeserver.com, to remotely access their servers. Remote access can be configured or even disabled on a per user basis. A guest account can also be configured, for example if you want to share music or photos with anyone who visits. I have not heard confirmation of this, but presumably, if the Zune adds wifi-to-computer sharing, it could be enabled to grab music from a Home Server.

Minimum system requirements:

  • 1 GHz Pentium 3 (or equivalent)
  • 512 MB RAM
  • 80 GB internal hard drive as primary drive
  • Bootable DVD drive
  • Display (only for software installation)
  • 100 Mbps wired Ethernet
  • Keyboard and mouse (only for software installation)

The home network must have a 100Mbps or faster Ethernet connection and computers running Windows XP SP2 or Windows Vista. The Home Server requires a wired Ethernet connection to the router, but client PCs can access it via a wireless connection.

Some features are only available with Windows XP SP2 or Windows Vista Business (or higher) systems, making the only way to get certain features is through Vista Ultimate. In other words, Home Server is going to be a major reason to buy Vista Ultimate, and Media Center aficionados will have to have at least one Ultimate PC to use certain features I can’t talk about and take advantage of Previous Versions.

There’s a lot more to say on this, and I’ve got screenshots of the software I’m trying to release. Follow the Home Server category for updates, or subscribe via RSS or email.

January 7th, 2007 Posted by | General, Home Server, Server | 37 comments



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37 Comments »

  1. [...] Now, we don’t know for sure what Gates is going to announce, but there have been oodles of rumors. Okay, I’ll tell you one thing: I have something, something huge, and completely 100% concrete. In fact, I’ve already started writing the post, post 2450 (for comparison, this is post 2461). The instant Bill Gates says the words on stage discussing this product, the post will go public, and boy, it is a doozy. [...]

    Pingback by » CES Is Here! Excitement To Come »  InsideMicrosoft - part of the Blog News Channel | January 6, 2007

  2. [...] Be sure to check out post 2450 for a huge amount of exclusive info during the keynote. [...]

    Pingback by » Pre-Keynote CES Gossip »  InsideMicrosoft - part of the Blog News Channel | January 7, 2007

  3. [...] However, there are some interesting rumors and speculation or “secrets” out there. Nathan Weinberg is ramping up for a pretty impressive post. He can’t talk about it now but once the Keynote finishes tonight, I’m told you can expect this post to go live. Be on the look out! [...]

    Pingback by All Registered for CES, Keynote is Tonight at MSTechToday | January 7, 2007

  4. [...] http://microsoft.blognewschannel.com/archives/2007/01/07/exclusive-windows-home-server-in-detail/ [...]

    Pingback by » Bill Gates CES 2006 Keynote LIVE! »  InsideMicrosoft - part of the Blog News Channel | January 7, 2007

  5. [...] The Home server http://news.com.com/Gates+sees+a+home+server+in+your+future/2008-1041_3-6147885.html Watching the CES broadcast they talked about a “home server” offering and then blocked it out saying it was intellectual property…. I don’t think they had the funny video at CES block out … so I guess this was the “blocked event” of the evening?  But in surfing around the net I’ve found some links already… Well I have a home server and yeah.. we’ve been saying for a long time that they need to take SBS and make a home server out of it…. http://microsoft.blognewschannel.com/archives/2007/01/07/exclusive-windows-home-server-in-detail/ http://on10.net/Blogs/jesse/windows-home-server-will-live-in-your-closet-simplify-your-life/ http://kindel.com/blogs/charlie/archive/2007/01/07/3602.aspx http://www.stopdigitalamnesia.com/ Share this post: email it! | bookmark it! | digg it! | live it! [...]

    Pingback by E-Bitz - SBS MVP the Official Blog of the SBS "Diva" : The Home server | January 8, 2007

  6. [...] Nathan Weinberg has the scoop on Windows Home Server. A Windows Home Server is a simple box that lies at the center of your home network. The Server works without interaction (it doesn’t run programs like typical operatings systems, doesn’t even have a monitor port), simplifying some very complex tasks among all the computers in your home. Home Server will be sold in two forms, just like Windows XP Media Center used to be: As a full hardware/software package by manufacturers, and as a software package to system builders. Home Server is designed as a “headless” system, which means that it is not designed to be accessed with a mouse, keyboard or monitor. In fact, the integrated hardware/software solutions are designed to be built without a monitor port! Minimum system requirements: [...]

    Pingback by O’Flaherty - » Nathan Weinberg has the scoop on Windows Home Server | January 8, 2007

  7. Great info…will continue to follow progress.

    Comment by Bill DeLapp | January 8, 2007

  8. I’m *very* curious how Home Server is going to integrate with Media Center machines. All that storage is wonderful but it’s usually your MCE machine that needs it. It would be nice if either:

    a) Recording support is built into server, so you can plug tuners into it and record TV while streaming it out to extenders, other PCs, MCE and the 360.

    b) A plug-in for MCE that would auto-copy finished shows from your MCE to the Home Server, thus you would need a smaller drive on your MCE and your mass storage can still live on the server.

    This is something I struggle with now, I have a MCE machine and I juggle moving shows back and forth between 4 drives just to insure I have enough space on the main recording drive.

    Comment by Shawn Oster | January 8, 2007

  9. [...] According to information provided on Inside Microsoft, beta 2 of home server will arrive in just 2 weeks, on January 22. They are projecting Release Candidate status by May 15 and final release to manufacturing on June 22. InsideMicrosoft had provided a great preview of feature avaialable in Windows Home Server. One of the hardware which will ship hardware with Windows Home Server is HP which will deliver it in HP MediaSmart Server. [...]

    Pingback by acchong.com » Blog Archive » Windows Home Server | January 8, 2007

  10. [...] EXCLUSIVE: Windows Home Server in Detail >> InsideMicrosoft [...]

    Pingback by net-K.us/blog ~ aeipathy for technology » CES Suprise, a new MS Windows! (no not vista!) | January 8, 2007

  11. [...] With the CES in full swing over the past few days, there’s always news of great little gadgets and upcoming releases. Except for the Zune and Vista (which has been almost ready for like five years), Microsoft has been making many headlines. The release of the Windows Home Server is changing that a bit, and from the look of the details, and more details, this one could be a home run. Yeah, I know, home run and Microsoft haven’t gone together since the days of the Windows 95 release, but this one might do it because the need is so great. Their only problem is that most people probably aren’t aware of the need yet… Picture from kindel.com [...]

    Pingback by Loved: Windows Home Server (at least the idea of it!) at DoubleFlavor - things loved, things hated | January 8, 2007

  12. [...] With all the traffic coming here today (seems like everybody and their mother linked to my Home Server scoop), it’s worth reminding everyone to vote in the KB Cafe blog awards. I’d pay particular attention to the “Best Microsoft Blog” category. That’s I-N-S-I-D-E-M-I-C… eh, you get it. Better throw InsideGoogle, Apple Watch and Hoffman’s Hearsay a bone while you’re at it. [...]

    Pingback by » Don’t Forget The KB Cafe Blog Awards »  InsideMicrosoft - part of the Blog News Channel | January 8, 2007

  13. Well, Shawn, the Home Server is designed to be underpowered, so I don’t see it handling recording TV, but hopefully it will (or someone will hack it to) handle transcoding. However, since you can use the Home Server as though it were a local hard drive, you can set Media Center to record directly to the Home Server, taking the copying out of the equation.

    Comment by Nathan Weinberg | January 8, 2007

  14. [...] For some more good information check out All about Microsoft, Charlie Kindel from the Windows Home Server team, and Inside Microsoft. [...]

    Pingback by Microsoft’s Home Invasion at Michael Specht - discussions on HR and technology | January 8, 2007

  15. [...] Bill Gates: 2007 International Electronics Show Keynote Speech Bill Gates Unveils Windows Home Server at the 2007 CES Q&A: Windows Home Server Simplifies Digital Life for Families Master Your Domain: Build a Corporate Network at Home EXCLUSIVE: Windows Home Server In Detail Home sweet home for Microsoft Gates: There’s a home server in your future The Home server Windows Home Server: What’s inside? Windows Home Server AnnouncementWindows Home Server Preview Microsoft, HP Unveil Windows Home Server [...]

    Pingback by The things that are better left unspoken : Active Directory at home | January 8, 2007

  16. Nathan, thanks for the thoughts. After reading some more I finally got the underpowered aspect.

    I’m curious what transfer rates you need to record streaming media and if recording over an ethernet connection really would be viable (i.e. record to WHS), plus how do multiple tuners impact that.

    I’m digging the headless aspect and I think the reference design (hmm, why does it also look like a recent Sony machine) is pretty cute. Actually now that I think about it a unit that looked like a WD MyBook would be perfect. Four 500GB MyBooks + 1 MyBook looking WHS all lined up in a row…

    Comment by Shawn Oster | January 8, 2007

  17. We interupt the strange gas leak in New York for CES 2007 day one

    Listening to Howard Stern live this morning and the crew vacated the studio because of an as yet unidentified gas smell wafting through the air and throughout the studio. The crew came back and they were taking calls from people saying: “You need…

    Trackback by Things That ... Make You Go Hmm | January 8, 2007

  18. [...] » EXCLUSIVE: Windows Home Server In Detail » InsideMicrosoft – part of the Blog News Channel (tags: Microsoft server windows) [...]

    Pingback by ARTbird309’s Blog » Blog Archive » links for 2007-01-09 | January 8, 2007

  19. Good question, Shawn. Well, as far as I know, Media Center records standard television at the lowest quality at 1.5 gigabytes per half hour, or 50 megabytes a minute. With wifi (g) running at 55 megabits per second (about 350 megabytes a minute), it can handle that. Higher quality video (full quality standard, any quality HD, or multiple tuners) will probably half to be buffered. If you have a decent amount of free storage space on the main PC, and Microsoft has smart buffering, it should work out.

    Of course, if you are doing heavy long-term tasks on the network and running both HD tuners at once, you could be in for a problem!

    I’d love the idea of a Home Server setup that looked like a bunch of books in a row. My router would go well in that lineup as well.

    Comment by Nathan Weinberg | January 8, 2007

  20. [...] Grows With You – Home Server will be designed to make it easier for users to expand its capabilities, especially making it easy to add more hard drives. Source: EXCLUSIVE: Windows Home Server In Detail [...]

    Pingback by » Windows Home Server Tips Dr.com | January 9, 2007

  21. [...] http://microsoft.blognewschannel.com/archives/2007/01/07/exclusive-windows-home-server-in-detail/  [...]

    Pingback by Microsoft CES 2007 » Informationworkers, enterprise 2.0 and web 2.0 resources | January 9, 2007

  22. [...] Bill launched Windows Home Server, which will make it easier for people with multiple PCs and devices to store, protect, and share their expanding collections of digital documents, photographs, music, and videos. He also introduced “Sync.” Based on the Microsoft Auto platform, Ford Sync is an updatable, smart and safe solution for connecting your car with your life that will appear in new Ford automobiles later this year. [...]

    Pingback by » CES & Commitments MicroMiel | January 9, 2007

  23. [...] According to InsideMicrosoft, Windows Home Server Beta 2 will be released on the January 22. Projected date for the Release Candidate as May 15 and the Release to Manufacturing on June 22. [...]

    Pingback by yozora.org :: tech life » Servers aren’t for enterprise environment only | January 9, 2007

  24. [...] A Windows Home Server is a simple box that lies at the center of your home network. The Server works without interaction (it doesn ’t run programs like typical operating systems, doesn’t even have a monitor port), simplifying some very complex tasks among all the computers in your home.read more | digg story [...]

    Pingback by Microsoft Announces Windows Home Server at CES at AlexOrmandyBlog | January 9, 2007

  25. [...] A Windows Home Server is a simple box that lies at the center of your home network. The Server works without interaction (it doesn ’t run programs like typical operating systems, doesn’t even have a monitor port), simplifying some very complex tasks among all the computers in your home.read more | digg story [...]

    Pingback by Microsoft Announces Windows Home Server at CES at AlexOrmandyBlog | January 9, 2007

  26. [...] Вчера на CES Билл Гейтс представил Windows Home Server – операционную систему для домашнего сервера. Это именно то, о чём так долго мечтали большевики (в моем лице). [...]

    Pingback by Not a kernel guy » Windows Home Server. | January 9, 2007

  27. [...] read more | digg story [...]

    Pingback by TerminalDigit - Microsoft Announces Windows Home Server at CES | January 12, 2007

  28. [...] Microsoft introduced a new file storage and backup server that is meant for the home.  Not everyone will really use one of these, but I’d recommend that everyone have some way of backing up their data.  This is one possible way to do it with ease. [...]

    Pingback by Kunefke.US » A Full Week of Technology | January 13, 2007

  29. [...] Windows Home Server loob lihtsust ja mugavust kodukasutajale Published 15 jaanuar 07 11:04 PL | kris  Microsoft Windows Server 2003 noorimast liikmest (koodnimega Q ehk Quattro) teavad hetkel veel vähesed, kuid radikaalsest ideest kantuna on see Microsoft Windows Serveri versioon kogumas aina positiivsemat tagasisidet. „Igas kodus peaks olema server – Windows Home Server”, ütleb Microsoft: “As computers and digital media become more and more central to family life, we need better ways to organize, share and protect digital content and information at home,” said Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft. “Windows Home Server makes it easy for families to save, protect and access digital memories and experiences so they can focus on using technology to organize their day-to-day lives, explore their interests and share their memories with the people they care about.” Alguses jahmatama panev väide, et igal kodukasutajal võiks kodus olla server, tundub pärast mõningast järelemõtlemist midagi heureka stiilis miks-küll-keegi-varem-pole-sellele-mõelnud. Aga Microsoft oskas, nähes infohulka, mis koduses arvutipargis end erinevate arvutite ketastel paikneb. Videod, pildid, dokumendid, muusika –  kõiges selles peaks WHS olulist mugavust ja lisaväärtust pakkuma. Tegelikult on „server” WHS mõistes midagi muud, kui igale vähegi IT inimesele sõnaga „server” assotsieerub. InsideMicrosoft andmetel on tegu masinaga, millel pole isegi monitori porti ja ka hiire/klaveri jaoks pesa pole mõtet hakata otsima: A Windows Home Server is a simple box that lies at the center of your home network. The Server works without interaction (it doesn’t run programs like typical operating systems, doesn’t even have a monitor port), simplifying some very complex tasks among all the computers in your home. Channel 9 video andmetel on WHS seadistamiseks ja kasutamiseks lausa kolm võimalust: spetsiaalne console (Windows Home Server Console), veebiliides (personaalne Windows Live Interneti aadress) ja Remote Desktop võimalus. Ja tegelikult on Microsoft minu meelest saanud hakkama tohutult märkimisväärse saavutusega. Sellepärast, et WHS: On integreeruv teiste Microsofti lahendustega, eelkõige Vista ja Xbox 360′ga. Kaotab digitaalse amneesia – mitte kunagi pole vajadust kustutada või tunda muret, et näiteks kordumatute hetkede pildid peaksid hävima. Hind peaks kõigi eelduste kohaselt jääma sobivaks ka hinnatundlikumale kliendile (alla 500$ peaks tulevikus maksma üks „kodune server”) Internetist on leitav juba ka täisväärtuslik demovideo Windows Home Serveri võimaluste kohta ehk Windows Home Server will live in your closet, simplify your life. Eelkõige pöörake demos tähelepanu just varundusvõimalustele, mida WHS pakub. Kuigi InsideMicrosoft seletab selle põhiväärtust natuke paremini: File backup works on the block cluster level, not on the file level. Windows Volume Snapshot Services tracks the hash values of every block on the disk and compares the hash values with those of blocks already backed up. If the hash value changes, it sends those blocks to the Home Server. Thusly, Home Server knows when only portions of a file has changed, and tracks those changes. By default, Home Server will backup every hard drive on every computer, internal or external. You can manage your backups from Home Server Console, choosing which to keep and which to delete. All storage on the Home Server is treated as a single drive, no matter how many drives you have, how they are split up, and whether they are internal or external, and there is no need for the user to configure what data goes on what drive. Hard drives do not have to be of equal size or type or speed, and Home Server will add them to available storage and determine which will be used for necessary duplication. Before you remove a hard drive, Home Server determines and explians to you how removal of that wdrive will affect the system, and will move critical data from that drive to other drives in the server. Ometi jäävad minu jaoks, hoolimata arvukatest demodest õhku mõned küsimused, millele oskab ehk mõni selle blogi lugeja vastata. Näiteks väga oluline punkt, mida ei mainita on turvalisus: mis siis kui WHS peaks sattuma võõrastesse kätesse? Kuna WHS põhineb Windows Server 2003 platvormil, siis pole sellel näiteks Bitlockeri tuge, nagu see oleks olnud Vista põhisel WHS’il. Lisaks – nagu valdav enamus kasutajaid on kogenud juhtub ikka nii, et Windowsit on vaja ümber installeerida. Kuidas seda teha aga WHS puhul, jääb küsitavaks (puuduvad ju võimalused WHS kasutada, kui sellel puudub operatsioonisüsteem). Aga ma usun, et kui WHS lõpuks kättesaadavaks muutub, muretsen selle ka endale. Esimene pildil nähtav Windows Home Server platvormil baseeruv server on tegelikult juba käega katsutava prototüübina ka olemas. Selleks on HP MediaSmart Server, mis on mulle ja kõigile teistele kättesaadav alates selle aasta sügisest. Filed under: Microsoft, CES, Windows Home Server [...]

    Pingback by MS_rev : Windows Home Server loob lihtsust ja mugavust kodukasutajale | January 15, 2007

  30. [...] Now Microsoft has introduced the Microsoft Home Server, I still don’t quite understand what it is and I’m a little sceptical as to whether it will be a success. It is going to be sold by other hardware vendoes who can OEM the concept and software from Microsoft. What happens if or when they lose interest? Apple are releasing the Apple TV. Again I’m a little sceptical, for one the avalable hard disk space is woefully inadequate plus it sounds like it is tied very closely to iTunes. [...]

    Pingback by ping » Blog Archive » The year of Media-players, Media-servers and Media-hubs? | January 17, 2007

  31. [...] Now Microsoft has introduced the Microsoft Home Server, I still don’t quite understand what it is about and I’m a little sceptical as to whether it will be a success. It is going to be sold by other hardware vendoes who can OEM the concept and software from Microsoft. What happens if or when they lose interest? Apple are releasing the Apple TV. Again I’m a little sceptical, for one the avalable hard disk space is woefully inadequate plus it sounds like it is tied very closely to iTunes. [...]

    Pingback by ping » Blog Archive » The year of Media-players, Media-servers and Media-hubs? | January 17, 2007

  32. [...] Not agree with the idea behind Microsoft Home Server… work in progress [...]

    Pingback by Casual.info.in.a.bottle » Blog Archive » My personal ideal home network | January 21, 2007

  33. [...] Nathan Weinberg has done a detailed post on upcoming Windows home server, There are three primary purposes of Home Server: [...]

    Pingback by Windows home server in detail - WebStuffScan - Scanning the Web for the good stuff! | January 23, 2007

  34. what is with all the, see post 2450 and post 2461 etc. where the hell you getting these #’s from? My screen shows no numbering for these posts.

    Comment by yea | February 17, 2007

  35. [...] It’s set to get released to the manufacturer on June 22nd, and would come as a hardware/software package, or just a software package to system builders. WHS has three main purposes: [...]

    Pingback by Get in on Windows Home Server Beta 2 - CyberNet News | February 19, 2007

  36. [...] of new and not-new technology, based on Windows Server 2003 R2. Take a look at the insider article here. It offers simplification and advance backup procedure, disk management and user management. Hmm.. [...]

    Pingback by SharePoint and Other Things : Windows Home Server beta | March 21, 2007

  37. [...] Microsoft is going to work very hard to tie into their other properties. Nathan Weinberg has some excellent coverage and puts the picture in perspective. The idea is that Home Server can act as the cloud for you in [...]

    Pingback by » Rich Internet Applications at CES | The Universal Desktop | ZDNet.com | May 22, 2007

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